February 2017 Port Report

BPA uses Port rail system to import transformer

Oversized cargo movements highlight the value of Lewiston’s multimodal Port

A BPA transformer, weighing approx. 320,000 lbs. and measuring 26’ x 12’ x 16.5’ was transported by Union Pacific into town via the Port’s rail line in early January. Omega Morgan is handling logistics to move the transformer to the Hatwai Substation near Genesee. Transformers convert high voltage electricity from power sources into lower voltage for use in businesses and homes.

 

The Bonneville Power Administration utilized the Port’s rail line in January to import a transformer bound for the Hatwai Substation near Genesee.

This recent shipment follows other notable movement of oversized cargo to and from the Port.

Last spring, Spokane-based American Alloy utilized the Port of Lewiston and the multiuse Columbia Snake River System to ship several units to the U.S. Navy Yard in Bremerton, Wash. And, this fall, Clearwater Paper took advantage of the river and the Port’s expanded dock to bring in new digester components.

“All of these projects demonstrate the important role our multimodal Port plays in the region,” said Port of Lewiston Commission President Mike Thomason. “Without access to and the interconnectivity of river, road and rail transportation options, oversized shipments like these would have met formidable challenges coming into and going out of our region.”

Activity at the Port’s dock will further increase this spring when the river system reopens from an extended maintenance closure. Clearwater Paper plans to use Port facilities to import sawdust for its production process.

Now is the time to take advantage of the Port’s proven Incubator Program

But, you don’t have to take our word for it…

A photo from inside the newly renovated Incubator Building, located at 1708 6th Ave. N. in Lewiston.

“(The Port of Lewiston keeps) the American dream alive at a time when it’s really hard.” – Coco Umiker, as reported in a June 11, 2015 Lewiston Tribune article.

Husband and wife duo Karl and Coco Umiker own Clearwater Canyon Cellars. The vintners are known for locally produced, award-winning wines. They also helped establish the Lewis-Clark American Viticultural Area. Clearwater Canyon Cellars recently moved their winery from the Incubator Building to a new building near their vineyard at 3143 10th St., Lewiston. For more: clearwatercanyoncellars.com

 

The Port has been very helpful in the growth of our business and making my dream a reality. Having the support of a proactive landlord to give us the help we needed and having additional space to grow as we needed has been very instrumental in our success…. Without the Port’s involvement, we would have been somewhat hamstrung renting an expensive small building, bounded by its walls instead of realizing our dream.” – Glen Seekins

Seekins Precision manufactures modern sporting rifles. Owners Glen and Katie Seekins took advantage of the Incubator Program to help launch their business. Seekins Precision moved to a brand new Lewiston facility in 2014. They are now selling products all over the country. For more: seekinsprecision.com

Upcoming festival will celebrate

our multiuse river

You’re invited! Mark your calendars and plan to attend the Snake River Family Festival scheduled for May 20 at the Port of Whitman County’s beautiful Boyer Park and Marina.

The festival will highlight the multipurpose Columbia Snake River System that is so crucial to the economy and quality of life in the region.

Wheat growers from Washington, Idaho and Oregon along with local port districts and other river partners have created this event to educate the public on the importance of the river system to fish, the Northwest economy and recreationalists.

Boyer Park is just downriver from Lower Granite Lock and Dam. The public is encouraged to attend, ask questions, eat and play as we celebrate the importance of our river system. Festivities begin at 11 a.m.

  • Salmon recovery is important and we have made tremendous progress. There will be an information tent with opportunities for the public to talk with experts about river transportation and salmon issues.
  • River navigation provided by the four Snake River locks and dams connects Idaho, Oregon and Washington farmers to markets and customers all over the planet.
  • The four Snake River dams provide clean hydropower and help integrate the growing portfolio of wind energy onto the grid.
  • The river is a key driver of tourism as well as on-water recreational opportunities such as boating, fishing and camping.
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Port officers and committee assignments

Mike Thomason was re-elected as the District 1 representative to the Port of Lewiston Commission in the November 2016 election (Current Term: 2017-2022).

At their January meeting, Port commissioners unanimously voted for Thomason to continue serving as president in 2017. Commissioner Jerry Klemm (District 3) will continue his position as vice president and Commissioner Mary Hasenoehrl (District 2) will continue her position as secretary/treasurer.

“We are grateful for Mr. Thomason’s willingness to seek re-election to the Port Commission and for his continued leadership,” said Commissioner Hasenoehrl. “His incredible business sense and even-keeled management approach are of great benefit to our Port District.”

Commissioners will also retain their current committee appointments in 2017:

Commissioner Hasenoehrl—Urban Renewal Agency Board
Commissioner  Klemm—Chamber of Commerce Government Affairs and Natural Resource Committees
Commissioner Thomason—Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors and the Valley Vision Board of Directors and Executive Committee.

Learn more about Port Commissioners

Former LCT manager recognized

Arvid Lyons spent approximately 30 years at the helm of Lewis-Clark Terminal, a privately-owned grain shipping facility adjacent to the Port of Lewiston. Under his direction, LCT added significant storage capacity, began offering federally compliant grain inspection on-site and modernized operations, among other accomplishments. He has also tirelessly supported our multiuse river system as the most environmentally friendly and economically viable shipping option for local wheat farmers.
Lyons recently received the 2016 Distinguished Service Award from the Idaho Wheat Commission. He is pictured here receiving the award from Commissioner Joe Anderson of Genesee.
Congratulations Arvid, your commitment to our region’s agriculture is a true inspiration. Courtesy photo

 

Changes are afoot at Harry Wall Industrial Park

In January, the Port of Lewiston welcomed Broemeling Steel & Machine as its newest tenant. The company is leasing just over 2 acres near FedEx and will soon begin construction of a new manufacturing facility there.

 

Meanwhile, work continues to prepare the site formerly held by EKO compost for new business ventures (approx. 15 acres). Riedesel Engineering has been working on a grading plan for the site and project bidding will soon be underway. The project has an estimated construction completion date of June 30, 2017.

“We are enthusiastic about the new developments at Harry Wall,” said Port Commissioner Jerry Klemm. “With easy access to river, road and rail transportation, this site is an essential industrial park for Lewiston.”

Just over 30 acres are available in Harry Wall Industrial Park. The Port’s ongoing development efforts at Harry Wall are detailed in a Master Plan, available on the Port’s website.

Port Commission Message

We would like to take this opportunity to highlight our FY 2016 independent audit, which was completed by Presnell Gage, PLLC and approved at our January Commission meeting.

Independent audits are vital for safeguarding public trust. The FY16 audit demonstrates the Port of Lewiston has a strong financial position, which will serve us well as we continue to invest in important economic development projects.

The Port’s Change in Net Position for FY16 was a positive $335,947. A positive change in Net Position for the year is synonymous with net income (profit) in the private sector.

Change in Net Position is the most accurate indicator of the year’s overall results and we are pleased to report the Port’s positive change in Net Position this year continues an upward trend. From FY13 to FY16, the Total Net Position of the Port increased $3,637,787.

Property taxes levied each year by the Port are dedicated to projects aimed at growing the economy and jobs. Our strong financial position allows us to spend more each year on these projects than what is received in taxes. For example, in FY16, the Port received $436,564 in property taxes and spent $895,711 on economic development projects.

Over the past four fiscal years, the Port has invested $5,908,935 in capital improvements to promote job creation.

Projects have included:

  • Design and construction for phase one of a fiber optic network
  • Acquired 6.33 acres of industrial property
  • Completed the permitting, design and construction of a 150-ft. dock extension
  • Utility improvements within the Harry Wall Industrial Park and Business and Technology Park
  • Early payoff of a $567,537 bond
  • Platting and design for 15-acres of site and infrastructure improvements in the Harry Wall Industrial Park

In FY17, the Port budgeted $1,827,600 to invest in capital improvements (compared to the $405,000 the Port budgeted to receive in property tax revenues). Our efforts this year include renovations at our incubator building and work at Harry Wall Industrial Park (highlighted in this newsletter).

We are also continuing buildout of the fiber optic network, which will increase redundancy and bandwidth for businesses and serve as a great business retention and recruitment tool.

The economic impact of these types of expenses/investments is not limited to the dollar amount of the actual projects. As Research Economist Steven Peterson’s 2014 Economic Impact Analysis documented, the Port’s efforts support businesses that create over 1,800 direct jobs and $390 million in direct regional spending. Every dollar of taxpayer investment creates $8.80 in local tax revenue.

At the same time, the Port continues to lower its tax levy rate, which has decreased by 64 percent since 1990 and by 15.3 percent over the past four years. Approximately 0.75 percent of the annual property taxes paid by a City of Lewiston household goes to the Port for economic development activities. This equates to less than $16 per year for the average household.

In summary, the annual audit reflects a strong Port District with an ongoing, positive change in Net Position. This allows us to combine Port profits with tax revenue to maximize investments in economic development. Reviewing figures from the audit alongside the most recent economic impact study paints a complete picture of the Port’s value to taxpayers and the return on investment taxpayers receive.

Our audits and other financial information are available for review on our website.

Mike Thomason
President
Jerry Klemm
Vice President
Mary Hasenoehrl
Secretary/Treasurer

Tenant News

The season is in full swing for the Lewis Clark Amateur Hockey Association, which leases the LC Ice Arena building from the Port.

The LC Bantam team (13-14 yrs.) won the Spokane Invitational tournament in January.

The Pee Wee team (11-12 yrs.) took second place at the LCAHA home tournament in January.

The Squirt Team (9-10 yrs.) has 15 wins and only one loss for the season.

LCAHA will host a TRY HOCKEY FOR FREE event on Feb. 25 from 2-4 p.m. Visit the website for more: http://lcaha.org/.